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Tuesday, November 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of Biological control of alligator weed found in the catalog.

Biological control of alligator weed

Richard W. Couch

Biological control of alligator weed

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Published by U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station in Vicksburg, Miss .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Alternanthera phylloxeroides -- Biological control -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[Richard W. Couch] ; sponsored by Office, Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army.
    SeriesTechnical report / Aquatic Plant Control Program -- 3., Technical report (Aquatic Plant Control Program (U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station)) -- 3.
    ContributionsGangstad, Edward O., Waterways Experiment Station (U.S.), United States. Army. Corps of Engineers., Aquatic Plant Control Program (U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination177 p. in various pagings :
    Number of Pages177
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15535092M


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Biological control of alligator weed by Richard W. Couch Download PDF EPUB FB2

Biological control of alligatorweed was Biological control of alligator weed book in with surveys in South America for natural enemies. Research in South America by U.S.

Department of Agriculture entomologists resulted in the introductions of three species of insects into the United States for control of by: The Biological Control of Weeds Book pdf Alligator weed pdf Alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) summary pdf File, KB pdf Alligator weed beetle.

Corpus ID: Potential Geographical Distribution of Alligator Weed and its Biological Control by Agasicles hygrophila @inproceedings{JulienPotentialGD, title={Potential Geographical Distribution of Alligator Weed and its Biological Control by Agasicles hygrophila}, author={M.

Julien and B. Skarratt and G. Maywald} }. Alligator weed [Alternanthera philoxeroides] is one of the greatest threats to waterways, wetlands, floodplains and irrigation systems in Australia. As a weed that can grow both on land and in water and can tolerate a range of control methods, herbicides in particular, alligator weed has serious impacts worldwide and in Australia.

This publication brings together information and advice from Cited by: 7. In: Van Driesche, R., et al.,Biological Control of Invasive Plants in the Eastern United States, USDA Forest Service Publication FHTET, p.

Pest Status of Weed. Alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides [Mart.] Griseb.) is a South American immigrant that has invaded waterways in the United States, primarily in the southeastern states. a biological control program. Alligator weed, Alter-nanthera populations of alligator weed are fertile and others sterphiloxeroides (Martius) Gisebach (Amaran-thaceae), is a target of biological control in Australia.

Its native range is southern South America (Argentina. The biological control of alligatorweed, Alternanthera philoxeroides, in the Unites States of America.

Aquatic Botany Aquatic Botany Texas Invasives Database. Each chapter has been written by practicing biological control of weeds researchers and provides details of the weed, the history of its biological control, exploration for agents, potential agents.

Biological control is a fascinating discipline where experimental projects are conducted at ecoregional scales. Biological control using natural enemies and native organisms is an important tool in the land manager's arsenal of weed control techniques.

The practice has been expanding from use primarily on rangelands and aquatic systems into. Biological control of alligator weed Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb. has been successful in limiting growth in water in areas with mild or warm winters, but not on land.

Until recently, herbicides have had very limited short term and no long term effectiveness. Several herbicides that now provide better control include: glyphosate over water, and metsulfuron and dichlobenil on land. Each chapter has been written by practising biological control of weeds researchers and provides details of the weed, the history of its biological control, exploration for agents, potential agents studied and agents released and the outcomes of those releases.

Each chapter has been written by practising biological control of weeds researchers and provides details of the weed, the history of its biological control, exploration for agents, potential agents. Ecological studies will include comparing habitats of the native and introduced ranges to identify the most promising biological control agents and studying factors that allow alligator weed to outcompete desired vegetation in Australia.

An example is the control of alligator weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides by Agasicles hygrophila in China. Elevated temperatures enabled the beetle to dramatically decrease Alternanthera philoxeroides growth.

However, the target species may also expand its. Biological control of alligator weed Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb. using Agasicles hygrophila, a Chrysomelid beetle, has been successful in limiting growth in water, but not on order to understand a possible genetic basis of this difference, technique using inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers was applied to analyse genetic diversity of this invasive weed.

Biological control and ecology of alligator weed Shon Schooler and Mic Julien Project no: CEN11 1 September, Land and Water Australia, Defeating the Weed Menace Programme. Insects have been used successfully as a form of biological control to suppress alligator weed in Florida and other states of the Southeast under the US Army Corps of Engineers aquatic control program in cooperation with the Division of Entomology Research of.

the ecology and biological control of Alligator Weed. RIRDC is commissioning some 50 projects in Phase 2 that both extends on the research undertaken in Phase 1 and moves into new areas.

Reports on these projects will be published in the second half of Biological control Three biological control agents from South America have been introduced into New South Wales. Two of these insects are established and contribute to control of alligator weed growing in water but not on land: flea beetle (Agasicles hygrophila).

XII International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds Pathogens as potential classical biological control agents for alligator weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides M.G.

Traversa,1 M. Kiehr,1 R. Delhey,1 A.J. Sosa2 and M.H. Julien3 Alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) is an evergreen species native of South is. Alligator weed thrips (Amynothrips andersoni) is native to Argentina and was first released in It is the least known of the alligator weed biological control insects.

Leaf damage by the thrips affects the plant by stunting its growth. This insect is the only one of the three that successfully controls the terrestrial form of alligator weed.

(USACE) to begin using biological control to manage alligator weed. Agasicles hygrophila, the alligator weed flea beetle, was first released in the United States inand has now become established in lakes and rivers throughout Florida.

However, because the alligator weed flea beetle cannot survive the winter of. Biological control of weeds has been practised for over years and Australia has been a leader in this weed management technique.

The classical example of control of prickly pears in Australia by the cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum, which was imported from the Americas, helped to set the future for biocontrol of weeds in many countries. Since then there have been many projects using. I am Barry Sampson and I have had 30 yrs experience in the Biological Control of Weeds with NSW Agriculture, CSIRO & other bodies and am now supplying agents for weeds including Patersons Curse, Bridal Creeper, St.

John's Wort, Blackberry, Docks, Thistles, Horehound, Prickly Pear & Aquatic Weeds like Salvinia, Water Hyacinth, Alligator Weed & others. Agasicles hygrophila, a leaf feeding Chrysomelid beetle, was introduced into New Zealand in for the biological control of alligator weed, Alternanthera tory studies showed that egg laying rate and viability were optimal at a constant temperature of 25°C.

Adult female longevity decreased as the temperature was increased from to 15°C to 30°C. Additional problems associated with alligator weed include decreased water flow and uptake for agricultural, municipal, and industrial purposes, and an increased expansion of human health risks with increases in mosquito breeding habitats.

Plant Description: Alligator weed is a creeping vine-like plant whose stem may reach 4 feet in length. Biological Control of Weeds is a unique catalog of this kind of information. The book consists of tables summarizing all known releases of biological control agents made prior to References are given for the information about each release.

The book includes information about more than species of biological control. The results indicated that control of alligator weed by the flea beetle would be restricted compared to areas at risk of invasion by the weed. Such predictions are being used in Australia to predict spread and efficacy of agents and to assist control planning and management of alligator weed.

Key words: Alternanthera, weed control, biological. Physical removal of alligator weed is possible, but not usually % successful in eradicating the weed because the plant is able to re-grow and propagate from stem fragments alone.

There are currently no biological control methods of eradication rather than goats which can keep the plant under control by feeding on the weed. Agasicles hygrophila is a species of leaf beetle known by the common name alligator weed flea has been used successfully as an agent of biological pest control against the noxious aquatic plant known as alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides).

This beetle is native to South America but has been imported to areas where alligator weed is a problem. Alligator weed is one of the world's worst weeds impacting aquatic and terrestrial environments.

It can choke waterways restricting flow and causing water qu. Alternanthera philoxeroides (C. Martius) Grisebach, alligator weed (Amaranthaceae) In book: A Review of Biological Control of Invertebrate Pests and Weeds in New Zealand.

Imogen Bassett, Quentin Paynter, Jacqueline Rae Beggs, Invasive Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed) associated with increased fungivore dominance in Coleoptera on decomposing leaf litter, Biological Invasions, /s, 13, 6, (), ().

The alligatorweed flea beetle is so successful that it is often used as the symbol of biological weed control. Within 4 years, alligatorweed was practically eliminated at the two northern Florida sites where the flea beetle was first introduced. The beetle is less effective in southern Florida and in northern areas of Alabama, Louisiana.

Biological control or biocontrol is a method of controlling pests such as insects, mites, weeds and plant diseases using other organisms.

It relies on predation, parasitism, herbivory, or other natural mechanisms, but typically also involves an active human management can be an important component of integrated pest management (IPM) programs.

Biological measures Insects have been released for the biological control of A. philoxeroides. The most successful and widely used is Agasicles hygrophila commonly called the alligator weed flea beetle; it has been released for biocontrol in Australia, China, Thailand, New Zealand, and the United States.

The alligator weed flea beetle, Agasicles hygrophila Selman & Vogt (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) has been used very successfully for the biological control of the widely-distributed invasive weed Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb (Caryophyllales: Amaranthaceae).

In order to extend the 'sh. Alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides), also spelled alligator weed, hails from South America but has been widely spread to the warmer regions of the United plant tends to grow in or near water but can also grow on dry land.

It is very adaptable and invasive. Getting rid of alligatorweed is the responsibility of any riparian or waterway manager. Partial success has been achieved with biological control agents against alligator weed and water hyacinth in Louisiana.

Control of giant salvinia with the salvinia weevil appears possible. The first use of an insect as an aquatic weed control agent was against alligator weed. The alligator weed flea beetle was introduced from by the. Practical weed management: protecting agriculture and the environment.

Julien MH, Skarratt B, Maywald GF. Potential geographical distribution of alligator weed and its biological control by Agasicles hygrophila. Journal of Aquatic Plant Management.

; – Kikvidze Z, Khetsuriani L. Belowground biomass of alligator weed in unmanipulated control plots was 10 times greater than aboveground biomass, highlighting the need to reduce belowground material if control is to be achieved. All herbicide treatments reduced belowground alligator weed biomass when compared with controls; however in the short term (8 d after the final.

Biological control: Alligator weed has a number of natural enemies in its native South America. During the mids, the alligator weed beetle was successfully imported to control infestations of alligator weed in Florida.

Two other insects, thrips and stem borers, were also imported and used in combination to control large infestations of.

Underlying principles. The underlying principle behind biological approach to weed control is based on some research works that reported that exotic plants become invasive because they have escaped from the insect herbivores and other natural enemies that limit their multiplication and distribution in their native regions [23, 24, 25]; however some other factors may contribute to the.